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A Daily Dose of Liberty Village: Talking to neighbourhood photographer Darryl Dash

Liberty | Written on February 24, 2015

There’s no doubt that Liberty Village is a photogenic neighbourhood. The mix of old and new weave together to create beautiful shots that showcase its modern developments as well as pay homage to the former industrial feel of the area. Darryl Dash started photographing Liberty Village when he moved into the neighbourhood in 2012. He shares this work on his blog, Liberty Village 365 where his stunning portraits of the Liberty Village neighbourhood are showcased on a weekly basis.

We spoke to Daryl on his passions, inspirations and why Liberty Village is so special to him.

Q: You’ve lived in Liberty Village since 2012—why did you decide to move to the neighbourhood?

D: We had lived in Etobicoke for over 20 years, and I felt this pull to move closer downtown. We were looking to do something new (start a church, believe it or not) in a new community. As we looked around, we kept coming back to Liberty Village. We really began to love it even before we moved here.

This is a picture of the A.R. Williams building, home to Canalfa. I love this building, especially at night. I think I was walking home from Metro one night and snapped this picture on the way.

This is a picture of the A.R. Williams building, home to Canalfa. I love this building, especially at night. I think I was walking home from Metro one night and snapped this picture on the way.

Q: What do you like most about Liberty Village?

D: I love the sense of community. Almost every time I go out, I meet someone I know. I love having many of my friends within a five minute walk. I also love that people are invested in the community. A lot of us really care about what happens here.

Q: What inspires your photography?

D: I was inspired by Sam Javanrouh, who posted a picture a day of Toronto for ten years. His photos are amazing. I wondered if I could do the same

thing in Liberty Village. I managed to post daily for two years, but now I’m starting to relax a little. If my photos are 10% as good as Javanrouh’s, I’d be happy.

This photo is in the west side of Liberty Village. I was poking around the streets one day and noticed the tracks. I got down almost on my knees to try to capture a track-level view. Some people think that’s an old picture, but it taken in 2013.

This photo is in the west side of Liberty Village. I was poking around the streets one day and noticed the tracks. I got down almost on my knees to try to capture a track-level view. Some people think that’s an old picture, but it taken in 2013.

Q: What makes Liberty Village so photogenic?

D: It’s always changing. It has the old buildings — brick and beam offices, abandoned warehouses, and old tracks. I find it fascinating to see the old and new together, and in such a fluid way.

Q: What is your favourite spot in Liberty Village and why?

D: I have many favourite spots, but one of them is the prison chapel in Liberty Village park. It represents the old as one of the last remnants of the old Central Prison, but it’s also the centrepiece of the new developments. Even though it’s empty, it’s still a beautiful building. It’s a fascinating building to look at.

I love the final picture not only for the view of the city from Liberty Village, but for what it represents. Someone saw my pictures at an art show, and invited me to her place to take a picture from her balcony. She let me come back at different times of the day. I love that someone was willing to open her place like that. It’s one of the things I love about Liberty Village.

I love the final picture not only for the view of the city from Liberty Village, but for what it represents. Someone saw my pictures at an art show, and invited me to her place to take a picture from her balcony. She let me come back at different times of the day. I love that someone was willing to open her place like that. It’s one of the things I love about Liberty Village.